WiFi for Chicks & Jocks…

chick'

arnold

WiFi for Dummies sounded too cliche and I suspect is a registered trademark, so I am going with WIFI for CHICKS & JOCKS.  This topic reminds me of when my old friend and former governor of California called WiFi Superman asking for help understanding WiFi.  He explained that although he had played superheroes, he was not actually a superhero nor was he extremely technical.  So I will try to recreate the primer I shared with him, this will teach you the basics.

WiFi is a technology that uses radio-frequency waves (electro-magnetic energy) that allows devices to communicate.  The standards that WiFi adheres to were developed by the IEEE under 802.11 (there are numerous amendments).  Two other bodies exist to regulate and provide interoperability for you and your WiFi devices.

The FCC regulates which frequencies you can “talk” on and how many watts are allowed.  The WiFi Alliance certifies devices by testing the functionality of devices to make sure that they comply with 802.11 standards and the amendments that add features and functionality.  The FCC is responsible for fining Marriott Hotels for jamming non-hotel signals as WiFi operates in an unlicensed frequency band and therefore anyone can transmit or receive on those bands.  The WiFi Alliance is responsible for making sure that your Dell laptop’s WiFi card can secure and communicate with  your Linksys wireless router.

WiFi exists in the 2.4 GHz (ISM band) and 5.0 GHz (U-NII) bands.  Not all cards support both.  802.11 started with data rates of 1 and 2 Mbps.  After amendments a,b,g,n,and ac we are looking at data rates in the Gbps range.  802.11n and 802.11ac have included many enhancement such as MIMO (multiple-input and multiple-outputand beamforming that make these high-throughput (HT) data rates possible.  Now might be a good time to get a cup of coffee if your brain is exploding or if you have had enough.

coffee

Okay apparently you want to know more.  So what is an Ad-Hoc network?  Essentially an Ad-Hoc network is a wireless network that does not use an Access Point as the central point of communication.  In an Ad-Hoc WLAN one device acts as the central coordinator (like a cell-phone Mi-Fi).  Having your device set to deny ad-hoc connections is a good security practice otherwise it is easy to be compromised by someone.  Other good practices are to avoid Open SSIDs as they do not use encryption and leave you vulnerable to eavesdropping.

open
“warchalking”           symbol for an             open SSID

So when setting up your home WiFi always use the strongest encryption.  Choose WPA2 over WPA,  AES over TKIP, and never use WEP: an easy WEP passphrase can be broken in seconds.  If you have advanced hardware and some time and patience you may be able to set up 802.1x/EAP as opposed to just PSK.  This also increases your security,  using 802.1x/EAP will prompt a mobile device for username and password.  The keys used by the AP when you use this method are more complex and change more often, they are therefore superior.

I remember Arnold had a specific question for me.  He asked, why is it that my wireless is always set to CHANNEL 6?”  I explained to the Governator that there are 14 channels in the ISM band, however one can only use 1 through 11 in North America.  Out of these 11 channels there are 3 that do not overlap.  They are 1, 6, and 11.  For some reason manufacturers almost always default to channel 6.

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I think that is enough for the first WIFI for CHICKS & JOCKS.  If you have specific questions you can leave me a message and I will reply on this blog.

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